A mother and her three children become demon-possessed after moving into a rental home that turned out to be haunted.

This may be the most amazing story I’ve ever read on the internet and is documented proof of the paranormal and demon-possession.  A Gary, Indiana family moves into a rental home to find that it is haunted, complete with horseflies buzzing inside the house in the middle of winter, apparitions leaving wet bootprints in the house, and loud, unexplainable noises that set the family on edge.  Then, it turns sinister.  The three children and the mother become possessed by demons.  As in, the kind of stuff you see in The Exorcist or The X-Files: children levitating above their beds, talking in unearthly voices, and in one case, one of the children actually walking up the wall and then upside down on the ceiling in full view of the horrified social worker and nurse who witnessed it.  The mother, desperately trying to get help, was actually shunned by most of the churches in her area.  She then visited a couple of clairvoyants, who told her that her house was infested by more than 200 demons.

The churches who shunned this woman should be absolutely ashamed of themselves.  Inexcusable.

I’ll post a few excerpts here, but this story should be read in its entirety.  It is mind-blowing.

1) A woman and three children who claimed to be possessed by demons. A 9-year-old boy walking backward up a wall in the presence of a family case manager and hospital nurse.

Gary police Capt. Charles Austin said it was the strangest story he had ever heard.

Austin, a 36-year veteran of the Gary Police Department, said he initially thought Indianapolis resident Latoya Ammons and her family concocted an elaborate tale as a way to make money. But after several visits to their home and interviews with witnesses, Austin said simply, “I am a believer.”

2) Campbell said Ammons’ sons cursed Onyeukwu in demonic voices, raging at him. Medical staff said the youngest boy was “lifted and thrown into the wall with nobody touching him,” according to a DCS report.

The boys abruptly passed out and wouldn’t come to, Campbell added. She cradled one boy in her arms; Ammons held the other.

Someone from the doctor’s office called 911. Onyeukwu said seven or eight police officers and multiple ambulances showed up.

“Everybody was … they couldn’t figure out exactly what was happening,” he recalled.

3) Later that evening, Washington and registered nurse Willie Lee Walker brought the two boys into a small exam room for an interview. Campbell joined them.

The 7-year-old stared into his brother’s eyes and began to growl again.

“It’s time to die,” the boy said in a deep, unnatural voice. “I will kill you.”

While the youngest boy spoke, the older brother started head-butting Campbell in the stomach.

Campbell grabbed her grandson’s hands and started praying.

What happened next would rattle the witnesses, and to some it would offer not only evidence but proof of paranormal activity.

According to Washington’s original DCS report — an account corroborated by Walker, the nurse — the 9-year-old had a “weird grin” and walked backward up a wall to the ceiling. He then flipped over Campbell, landing on his feet. He never let go of his grandmother’s hand.

http://www.indystar.com/story/news/2014/01/25/the-disposession-of-latoya-ammons/4892553/

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Retiring Democrat Congressman admits that his party has no idea how to fix ObamaCare.

It’s not going to work because young people are not signing up and have no incentive to sign up.  That’s pretty much it.  If that continues, the whole law will unravel.  Of course, this will be after millions more have lost their health insurance.  The congressman is Jim Moran from Virginia.

“I’m afraid that the millennials, if you will, are less likely to sign up. I think they feel more independent, I think they feel a little more invulnerable than prior generations,” Moran says. “But I don’t think we’re going to get enough young people signing up to make this bill work as it was intended to financially.”

“And, frankly, there’s some legitimacy to their concern because the government spends about $7 for the elderly for every $1 it spends on the young,” Moran says.

“I just don’t know how we’re going to do it frankly,” he says. “If we had a solution I’d be telling the president right now.”

http://wamu.org/news/14/01/24/moran_not_enough_millenials_using_health_care_exchange

Gee, I wonder if President Obama will be apologizing to the American people tonight in his State Of The Union speech for ramrodding this law down our throats when we didn’t want it, didn’t ask for it, and told us that we could keep our own health insurance if we were happy with it.  I’m so glad we have a political party in Washington that knows what’s best for us better than we do and is there to take care of us.  Democrats are all about standing up for the middle class!  Right?

The Seattle Seahawks, Super Bowl XLVIII, and the demonization of Richard Sherman.

For those of you that follow the NFL and were watching the conference championship games this last weekend, you were treated to a classic game between the Seahawks and the 49ers.  I’ve been watching the NFL since I was very young and it was one of the best games I’ve ever seen.

Especially since the team I was rooting for won…..spectacularly.  Hehe.

I don’t like the San Francisco 49ers.  I’ve never liked them going back to the days of Joe Montana and Jerry Rice.  In fact, the only team in pro sports that I have more contempt for is the Los Angeles Lakers.  But the Lakers are another topic for another day.  Today, I’m here to gloat:

The Seattle Seahawks are going to the Super Bowl.  And they beat the 49ers to get there in one of the greatest games ever played.

Let’s let Steve Raible tell the story of the deciding play, which will likely go down in history as one of the most important plays in Seahawks history:

http://www.seahawks.com/videos-photos/audio/Audio_Raible_calls_Malcolm_Smith_interception/12514e94-fa90-4752-9fdc-d0a67557f0f4

Music to my ears.

Now to the issue of Richard Sherman.

Following making the amazing play that allowed Malcolm Smith make the game-deciding interception, Sherman had this to say seconds after the game was over:

Apparently, Michael Crabtree (the receiver for the 49ers who Sherman was covering during that last play) and Richard Sherman do not like each other.  This goes back to an occurrence that happened during the off-season where Crabtree and Sherman got into it during a charity event.  Also, factor in that the Seahawks and 49ers have become bitter rivals since the Seahawks moved to the NFC West (a division that has traditionally been dominated by the 49ers for decades) and a reaction like this from Sherman wasn’t entirely surprising to me.

It was to the rest of the world, though.  Social media blew up calling Sherman every name in the book for his post-game rant.  It’s become a bigger story than the actual game itself, which is odd given what a great game it was.  But as Isaac Saul from the Huffington Post expertly pointed out in his article about Sherman, explain to me how Sherman’s rant posted above is any different than this:

Or any of this:

I don’t see how the two are different.  Two young men, decades apart, who claim to be the greatest at what they do and are talking trash to their rivals.  We celebrate Muhammad Ali for how great he was and for his flamboyant trash-talking, but when Richard Sherman does it after making the greatest play of his career that sends his team to the Super Bowl, he’s demonized?

Why?

The hard truth is that Richard Sherman is not only the best cornerback in football, he may be the best defensive player in the league, period.  There’s a strong chance that Richard Sherman will be named Defensive Player Of The Year by the NFL.  He’s very good and he’s only in his second year in the league.  He was absolutely right in everything he said.  What has also been almost completely ignored is that right after the play, Sherman tried to shake Crabtree’s hand only to get shoved in the face by Crabtree.  Granted, the handshake offered by Sherman may not have been very sincere, but Crabtree could easily have ignored him and done nothing at all.  Shoving him in the face wasn’t necessary.  But Sherman is the bad guy for giving a fiery interview claiming to be the best at his position?

Well, guess what?  He is the best.  And, like it or not, the Seattle Seahawks are the NFC Champions and are playing the Denver Broncos in Super Bowl XLVIII.  So, let’s start talking about that instead of just Richard Sherman. The Denver Broncos have the #1 offense in the league and the Seahawks have the #1 defense in the league.  This has the potential to be a game even better than the one I’ve been talking about in this post.   So let’s get excited!

Ohio death sentence inmate takes 20 minutes to die after the state uses untested lethal injection cocktail.

I don’t have a concrete position on the death penalty, but this is bad.  Really, really bad.

An Ohio man who was convicted of murder and sentenced to die has become the latest example of why the State should not have the power to impose death penalties. Dennis McGuire took over 20 agonizing minutes to die after being injected with a combination of drugs never before used for executions in the US. McGuire’s attorney Allen Bohnert labeled the incident “a failed, agonizing experiment.”

The Eighth Amendment of the US Constitution forbids cruel and unusual punishment. The family plans to sue the state of Ohio, and justifiably so. The methods of State execution have varied over US history, the Supreme Court has upheld the death penalty as not being in violation of the Eighth Amendment twice. The legal standard has been that methods of execution must not inflict “unnecessary pain.” Most recently, in the 2008 case Baze v. Rees, the court upheld lethal injection.

The specific lethal injection cocktail which was used in that Kentucky case was similar to those used in other states. In McGuire’s case, however, a new cocktail which was previously unused in the US was used. That being so, the Baze ruling should not have bearing on any cases stemming from the McGuire’s botched execution.